Planning your family growth in an undeveloped country

In general, the population boom is over. Fertility worldwide has fallen from 6 percentage points to 3 between 1950 and 1998, and another 1 percentage point between 1998 and 2014. Yet, in the underdeveloped countries natality is still high, respectively higher than mortality. This is one of the reason why Kosovo, who is ranked among the most underdeveloped countries in the world, has the youngest population in Europe.

Based on many anal
ysts worldwide – there is a correlation between fertility/natality and country’s development ratio, respectably countries with high natality are mainly undeveloped, and vice-versa. Analysts argue that high fertility can impose costly burdens on nations. It may impede opportunities for economic development, increase health risk – especially for women and children, it can reduce access to education, employment, scare resources, reduce nutrition, etc.

f-scott-fitzgerald-quote-the-rich-get-richer-and-the-poor-get-children

We all know how hard it is to plan you family growth in a developed country, especially for educating and working mothers. But, how hard is for an educated women to plan her family growth in an undeveloped country, such as Kosovo?

First of all, let me explain why I’m distinguishing between educated and un-educated women. An educated women in an undeveloped country most probably is working full-time- in an office, or having a managerial position. She is also the provider in her family. An uneducated woman, might work, but usually don’t (especially in Kosovo, where getting a degree is very easy). One way or another an uneducated woman is not the provider in her family, contrary she is the spending one. She can spend all her salary on herself (because her salary is very low), or if she’s not working she is the spender of her husband’s salary. In both ways she’s not managing money and as such she’s not aware of her family incomes; she is used to poverty; she has no luxury wishes; and sometimes children for her represent a full-time job and as such she would like to be engaged on something – so for her giving birth to many children is the greatest achievement. On the other hand an educated-working mother needs to plan every detail of her life – starting from every cent of her money –to the possibility of losing her job.. She has to analyze if she can afford to have another baby, how will the baby affect the relation with her husband, with her older children, with her friends; will she be able to provide to her demanding child everything (or most of the things) his friends at school have; will she be able to educate him properly; and the questioning list goes on and on.

It sound pretty much the same if we compare with the way working mothers think in developed countries right?- But with a big difference.. In undeveloped countries such as Kosovo, the availability to working places is very limited. Economic developed is stagnated and no new working places are offered. Politics is so powerful that unless you are engaged in politics and/or nepotism finding a proper and stable working place is almost close to impossible. Therefore you keep planning on air, because you know you can’t plan anything more than one year ahead. All of us have loans, but loan interest rate in Kosovo are between 9-25% compounding, respectively for a loan of €15,000 you return around €23,000 at the end (or more). You are aware that your job is not secured and that tomorrow someone else might replace you just because he has stronger connections than you, and you won’t be able to find a job for around 1 year, while you have to pay your monthly loan, plus your credit-cards.

… and we still happily decide to have another child, and not stick to one child family philosophy, because for us FAMILY is the most important thing in life. We know the power of siblings when you’re old enough to understand that power. We know the power of children when we become old enough not to be able to look after ourselves; we know the security and love our parents gave us and we want to pass on the same feeling. We know the connection and how supportive friends are – and we want our children to live all this. Family and family virtues and family bonds are not vanished yet and this gives us hope, this gives us a reason to move on, work hard and provide miracles to our children, because we know the importance of family.

May God bless our families worldwide!

fplogo30011

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s